Zoekresultaat: 3 artikelen

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Jaar 2013 x

    In this article a longitudinal effect study is described of resilience training Diamant. The training focuses in particular on adolescents with a dual identity who do not have work, are not enrolled in an education, feel unfairly treated (relatively deprived), have low self-esteem, and are at risk of social isolation. The training can be considered as a method to prevent development of criminal behaviour and possibly radicalisation. Certified trainers work with small groups of 10 to 15 adolescents to increase their resilience and help them finding their place in society. The present research focused on the following questions: (1) Does this training have a positive effect on self-esteem among the participants? (2) Does social isolation decrease as a consequence of the training? (3) Does the training reduce feelings of relative deprivation and help participants better deal with conflicts? Participants were interviewed before and halfway the training and directly after completing the training. A follow-up measurement three months after the end of the training examined effects on the longer term. In total 44 semi-structured interviews were held. Interviews were written out and coded using a two-step procedure: In the first step two researchers independently coded each interview. Second, when necessary, changes in the coding scheme were made. Then each interview was coded separately by the two researchers and disagreements were discussed until full agreement was reached. The results show that Diamant has a positive effect on self-esteem of participants. Also, participants overall showed an increase in connectedness to society. Third, Diamant reduced feelings of relative deprivation and participants indicated they could better deal with conflicts. Based on these results it is concluded that Diamant is effective in regard to its goals which were evaluated in this study. Limitations of the research and possibilities for future studies are discussed.


Allard R. Feddes
Dr. Allard Feddes is als postdoctoraal onderzoeker verbonden aan de Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen, afdeling Sociale Psychologie, Universiteit van Amsterdam. E-mail: A.R.Feddes@uva.nl.

Liesbeth Mann
Drs. Liesbeth Mann is als promovenda verbonden aan de Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen, afdeling Sociale Psychologie, Universiteit van Amsterdam. E-mail: L.Mann@uva.nl.

Nathalie de Zwart
Nathalie de Zwart, BSc, was ten tijde van het onderzoek als onderzoeksassistente verbonden aan de Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen, afdeling Sociale Psychologie, Universiteit van Amsterdam. E-mail: dezwart.n@gmail.com.

Bertjan Doosje
Prof. dr. Bertjan Doosje is verbonden aan de Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen, afdeling Sociale Psychologie, en het Amsterdam Institute for Social Sciences (AISS) ‘Challenges to Democratic Representation’. Hij is als bijzonder hoogleraar bekleder van de FORUM Frank Buijs-leerstoel voor Radicaliseringsstudies. E-mail: E.J.Doosje@uva.nl.

    In this article I will explore the concept of transgression within the realm of rock music using the biography of Lou Reed, known for such songs as ‘Walk on the Wild Side’ and ’I’m Waiting for the Man’. I discuss Lou Reed’s social transgressions as a reaction to and resistance toward institutions of social control such as family, media and the music industry, which stigmatized him as an outsider. This study, which is based on secondary material, such as biographies, interviews and songs, shows how Lou Reed transgressed social norms with respect to drugs, sex, and gender.


Thaddeus Müller
Dr. Thaddeus Müller is verbonden aan de sectie criminologie van de Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam. E-mail: Muller@law.eur.nl.
Diversen

Is the peer ethnographic approach a suitable method for researching lives of undocumented migrants?

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift over Cultuur & Criminaliteit, Aflevering 1 2013
Trefwoorden peer methods, undocumented, ethnographic, research
Auteurs Latefa Narriman Guemar en Helen Hintjens
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    This article reflects on some of the qualities and strengths, as well as some potential weaknesses, of a research methodology used to study ‘hard-to-reach’ groups, such as the undocumented. This approach, known as the PEER (Participatory Ethnographic Evaluation and Research) approach, is introduced in terms of its key elements of trust, anonymity, in-depth data and flexibility. Its suitability for sensitive, or ‘liminal’ research issues, involving groups of vulnerable informants, is explained. The method is based on relations of trust, which are maintained through anonymity in data collection, and extend from social researchers to informants, through the intermediation of trained community-based peer researchers. It is they who interview others in their own social networks; since trust is the key ingredient in making this ethically-informed methodology work well, trust must be invested also in the peer researchers, who form part of the research team.


Latefa Narriman Guemar
Latefa Narriman Guemar is als PhD-student verbonden aan het Centre for Migration Policy Research, Swansea University. Tevens is ze verbonden aan de London School of Economics in London. E-mail: guemarn@yahoo.fr

Helen Hintjens
Dr. Helen Hintjens is universitair docent Development and Social Justice bij het International Institute of Social Studies te Den Haag (onderdeel van de Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam). E-mail: hintjens@iss.nl
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