Zoekresultaat: 3 artikelen

x
De zoekresultaten worden gefilterd op:
Rubriek Artikel x
Artikel

Migranten, banken en veiligheid in tijden van globalisering

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift over Cultuur & Criminaliteit, Aflevering 1 2013
Trefwoorden Customer due diligence, w undocumented migrants, remittance investment, phone-based remittances
Auteurs Prof. mr. dr. Sarah van Walsum
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Measures to combat international crime include customer identity controls by banks and repressive measures against informal money transfer systems. While there is debate surrounding the latter strategy, customer identity controls are largely taken for granted in the Netherlands. The author argues that these controls can negatively affect migrants. Moreover, exclusion of migrants from regulated banking systems has development implications. Phone-based remittances, that are linked to the regulated banking system, could serve as an alternative for informal transfer systems. Too stringent identity controls in host countries seem to prevent this however. The author recommends that controls focus on the amount being transferred, rather than on the person making the transfer.


Prof. mr. dr. Sarah van Walsum
Prof. mr. dr. Sarah van Walsum is hoogleraar migratierecht en familiebanden aan de Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. E-mail: s.k.van.walsum@vu.nl
Artikel

Criminaliteit en werk

Een veelzijdig verband

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift voor Criminologie, Aflevering 2 2011
Trefwoorden employment, corruption, organisational crime, life course
Auteurs Judith van Erp, Victor van der Geest, Wim Huisman e.a.
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    Employment and crime are commonly assumed to be negatively correlated. Those employed are less likely to commit crimes, and conversely, those who have a criminal record are less likely to become employed. Criminological research has provided strong empirical and theoretical support for the link between employment and crime, but also suggests that a complex set of mechanisms may be at play. Additionally, studies show that employment can also increase the risk of criminal behaviour. In the introduction of this special issue, three causal relationships in the work-crime nexus will be discussed: employment causing crime, employment preventing crime, and crime blocking future employment.


Judith van Erp
Dr. J.G. van Erp is criminoloog aan de faculteit rechtsgeleerdheid van de Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, vanerp@frg.eur.nl.

Victor van der Geest
Dr. V.R. van der Geest is als universitair docent verbonden aan de afdeling Strafrecht en Criminologie van de Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam en als onderzoeker aan het Nederlands Studiecentrum Criminaliteit en Rechtshandhaving (NSCR), vvandergeest@nscr.nl.

Wim Huisman
Prof. dr. W. Huisman is hoogleraar Criminologie aan de Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, w.huisman@rechten.vu.nl.

Janna Verbruggen
J. Verbruggen, MSc is als promovendus verbonden aan het Phoolan Devi instituut, in een samenwerkingsverband tussen de Afdeling Strafrecht en Criminologie van de Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam en het Nederlands Studiecentrum Criminaliteit en Rechtshandhaving (NSCR), jverbruggen@nscr.nl.
Artikel

Vrouwen en witwassen: een logische combinatie met incoherente resultaten

Tijdschrift Tijdschrift voor Veiligheid, Aflevering 2 2010
Trefwoorden vrouwen, georganiseerde misdaad, witwassen, 420bis
Auteurs Melvin Soudijn
SamenvattingAuteursinformatie

    A part in Dutch penal law defines money laundering as ‘any person who acquires an object, possesses it, hands it over or sells it or makes use of an object, knowing that the object originates – directly or indirectly – from an offense’. Under object is meant any goods and any property rights. With this in mind, the author argues that whoever knows that money (the object) is derived from crime, but spends the money anyway, is committing a money laundering offense. Taking the argument one step further, it is therefore a reasonable hypothesis that a large number of wives or girlfriends of criminals, have been prosecuted for money laundering. That is, if the women knew that the money they spent was obtained through crime. To test the hypothesis, 62 cases dealing with organized crime were selected and analyzed. These cases largely focus on male perpetrators of drug crimes, money laundering, human smuggling and human trafficking. It turns out that the women often knew their male friends or husbands were involved in crime. The women also profited of these crimes because they used their friends’ expensive cars, lived in large mansions and often went shopping for luxury items. Still, hardly anyone was prosecuted for money laundering offenses. Several explanations were found, ranging from pity of officers, an overload of work, absence of direct proof or simply male chauvinist bias. Only if the women were actively involved in other crimes, would they find themselves prosecuted with (among others) money laundering offenses.


Melvin Soudijn
Melvin Soudijn is als senior wetenschappelijk onderzoeker werkzaam bij de KLPD. E-mail: Melvin.Soudijn@klpd.politie.nl.
Interface Showing Amount
U kunt door de volledige tekst zoeken naar alle artikelen door uw zoekterm in het zoekveld in te vullen. Als u op de knop 'Zoek' heeft geklikt komt u op de zoekresultatenpagina met filters, die u helpen om snel bij het door u gezochte artikel te komen. Er zijn op dit moment drie verschillende filters: tijdschrift, rubriek en jaar.